Introducing Greubel Forsey's New GMT Sport

Introducing Greubel Forsey's New GMT Sport

The Low-Down

Available in an edition limited to 33 pieces, the GMT Sport once again refreshes its mechanical concept of high precision and “globetrotter worthiness” through a reshaped titanium case highlighting the complex movement and its colorful, functional art. Unlike the two previous GF “sporty” watches —the first GMT Sport and the Balancier S— the bezel of this piece does not feature the engraving with the values that distinguish GF watchmaking. Instead, a horizontal satin-brushing on the caseband and impeccable polishing on the bezel edges amplify the watch face with its new, dominant blue hue, another “first” in Greubel Forsey’s history.

This is Greubel Forsey’s first timepiece in an all blue colorway, right from the mainplate to the globe and the second time zone dial, everything is in the same blue hue.
This is Greubel Forsey’s first timepiece in an all blue colorway, right from the mainplate to the globe and the second time zone dial, everything is in the same blue hue.
The new GMT Sport’s open-worked suspended arched bridge and tourbillon bridge add depth to its multidimensional display
The new GMT Sport’s open-worked suspended arched bridge and tourbillon bridge add depth to its multidimensional display

Indeed, this GMT Sport is the first Greubel Forsey timepiece to offer an all-blue language: the mainplate, the globe, the second time zone dial, and the 24-second ring at 1 o’clock are all in the same blue hue. The suspended arched bridge and the tourbillon bridge have an openwork that adds some “depth” to the multidimensional display. Thus, the blued parts and highly polished metal surfaces (titanium for the bridge and the globe and steel for the hands) create a good contrast in the movement that improves readability.

Of course, the other central element in the new and blue GMT Sport is the new integrated three-link bracelet, the first of its kind for a Greubel Forsey watch. Knowing the love of art and passion for detail professed by the La Chaux-de-Fonds atelier, the new metal bracelet crafted in grade 5 titanium is an impeccable piece of work in its own right. The craftsmen have paid particular attention to every angle and surface of the three side links and the central link. Graining was chosen to evoke the lugs’ finish, thus favoring aesthetic continuity between the case and the band. The titanium bracelet also features a quick adjustment system to provide a few millimeters of amplitude to improve comfort.

The new GMT Sport is offered on an integrated three-link bracelet, the first of its kind for a Greubel Forsey watch.
The new GMT Sport is offered on an integrated three-link bracelet, the first of its kind for a Greubel Forsey watch.
On the back, there is a 24-city, full world-time disk, which, like the globe, rotates once per day, and shows the time in 24 different time zones.
On the back, there is a 24-city, full world-time disk, which, like the globe, rotates once per day, and shows the time in 24 different time zones.

Mechanically, GMT Sport puts under the spotlight two of Greubel Forsey’s significant complications. First is the unprecedented 24-second tourbillon inclined at 25 degrees —the third great invention of the house—the axiomatic proof of GF’s eagerness to seek maximum chronometry. Secondly, there is the globe located between 7 and 9 o’clock. This element performs a 24-hour rotation and allows the world time to be read intuitively. Visible from the north pole perspective, a ring with the 24-hour indication allows the local time to be read from all longitudes, taking into account the day/night indication. On the back of the watch, a disc of cities completed by two rings allows reading UTC world time and daylight saving time in the 24 cities corresponding to the main time zones.

IMHO

This third “sporty” variant of the GMT Sport confirms that previous issues have been a resounding success. This is due to an attractive —and even innovative— mix of aesthetic elements with the house’s savoir-faire. In particular, the decision to have freed the case and bezel from the engravings of Greubel Forsey’s guiding principles ensures an expanded appeal to collectors who were unconvinced by the burden of literature on the case.

Positioned between 7 and 9 o'clock, the globe on this watch performs a 24-hour rotation and allows the world time to be read intuitively.
Positioned between 7 and 9 o'clock, the globe on this watch performs a 24-hour rotation and allows the world time to be read intuitively.

The watch’s surfaces add to the unique mechanical concept and extol the invention that brings the outstanding caliber to life. The use of a homogeneous blue color for the watch refreshes the concept we knew from the first GMT Sport of late 2019 —which featured lots of greys— and exalts a touch of informality. Of course, the new titanium bracelet is the ultimate differentiator. Even without seeing it in person, it’s clear that it would be an argument that would further elevate the desirability (if it were a possibility) of this new, sportier Greubel Forsey.

Tech Specs

Greubel Forsey GMT Sport
Greubel Forsey GMT Sport

Movement: Mechanical, hand-wound; hours and minutes; small seconds; power reserve indicator; 24-second inclined tourbillon; 21,600 bph; 72-hour chronometric power reserve
Dial: Three-dimensional, variable geometry hour-ring, with luminescent hours and minutes indexes; GMT indicator with raised engraving; power-reserve indicator, engraved and lacquered; tourbillon rotation indicator in gold; rotating globe with fixed day-and-night UTC indicator in synthetic sapphire, engraved and lacquered
Case: Titanium Grade 5, 42mm (caseband) and 45mm (bezel); curved synthetic sapphire glass; 100-meter water resistance
Strap: Titanium integrated bracelet with fine adjustment and folding clasp; rubber strap with titanium folding clasp
Availability: Limited edition of 33 pieces

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Israel Ortega

Israel Ortega has always been passionate about luxury cars and watches. He has spent the last two decades covering these two areas of interest extensively. He started his career with Mexico’s leading auto magazine ‘Automóvil Panamericano’ and also worked at the ‘Car and Driver’ as its editor-in-chief between 1999 and 2006. He has been contributing to Revolution since 2012 and is currently the editor-in-chief for the Mexico and Latin American editions.

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