Introducing the Second Generation Oris Aquis Depth Gauge

Introducing the Second Generation Oris Aquis Depth Gauge

The Low-Down

The last thing you want when you’re making a 500m-rated dive watch is to put an extra hole in it. Unless, of course, the dive watch is the second generation of the mighty Aquis Depth Gauge, where that extra aperture is key to the whole affair.

In the new Oris Aquis Depth Gauge, the process used to mill the channel into the outer edge of the crystal has been refined so the accuracy and legibility of the gauge are increased.
In the new Oris Aquis Depth Gauge, the process used to mill the channel into the outer edge of the crystal has been refined so the accuracy and legibility of the gauge are increased.

IMHO

The mechanical depth gauge used on this Oris (one which follows the principles of Boyle-Mariotte Law, for the science geeks out there), is deceptively simple. Water is allowed into a graded channel, marked for depth, compressing the air in the channel the greater the water pressure is, creating an easy-to-read watermark against which you can get an accurate depth reading. On this Oris Aquis Depth Gauge, the scale channel is milled in the outer edge of the thick sapphire crystal, allowing the depth to be read around the outer edge of the dial. In this second generation, the milling process of the sapphire has been improved, allowing for greater accuracy and legibility.

The Aquis Depth Gauge uses the scientific principles of the Boyle-Mariotte Law to create a gauge that clearly measures depth during a dive.
The Aquis Depth Gauge uses the scientific principles of the Boyle-Mariotte Law to create a gauge that clearly measures depth during a dive.
Powered by Oris 733, the new Depth Gauge is water resistant up to 500m
Powered by Oris 733, the new Depth Gauge is water resistant up to 500m

The titular depth gauge isn’t the only improvement on this new watch. The large 45.8mm watch now employs Oris’ Quick Strap Change system, allowing the wearer to easily swap from rubber to bracelet without needing to employ tools — which is great. On top of that, Oris’ quick-change system feels secure and robust, which is what you want on a professional grade diver.

The watch’s caseback has been re-engineered so the metres-to-feet conversion chart is always set at 90 degrees to the 12 o’clock position.
The watch’s caseback has been re-engineered so the metres-to-feet conversion chart is always set at 90 degrees to the 12 o’clock position.
Thanks to Oris’ new patented Quick Strap Change system, the wearer can now switch the stainless steel metal bracelet and rubber strap without using any tools.
Thanks to Oris’ new patented Quick Strap Change system, the wearer can now switch the stainless steel metal bracelet and rubber strap without using any tools.

The final tweak to the model is that the caseback features an improved layout of the metres to feet conversion chart. Aside from these incremental upgrades, the Oris Aquis Depth Gauge is still the same tank of a watch. With black dial, black ceramic bezel and 24mm integrated steel bracelet (rubber is also an option), every one of its generous 45mm scream professional dive watch — with the depth gauge adding the final technical touch.

Tech Specs

Movement: Oris 733, automatic, date, 38 hours of power reserve.
Case and dial: Stainless steel, 45.8mm, rated to 500m water-resistance, unidirectional bezel with ceramic insert, sapphire crystal witth depth gauge. Black dial.
Strap: 24mm rubber strap or stainless-steel bracelet.
Price and availability: Available in May; USD 3900 for the rubber strap version and USD 4100 for the bracelet model

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Felix Scholz

Felix Scholz has spent the last decade covering watches from his home in Australia. Given this, it's surprising that he still struggles with time zones. Over the years he's become a firm believer that less is more when it comes to watch design – except when a rainbow bezel is involved. He's written for numerous titles including Hodinkee, GQ, A Collected Man and more. These days he looks after the Australian edition of Revolution and takes a break from writing about watches to talk about them, as the co-host of OT: The Podcast.